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Technically Speaking - Demystifying Roast Analysis!

Technically Speaking is the title of a recurring column that our very own product manager Chris Hallien is writing for Roast Magazine. In these columns, he tries to shed light on some technical aspects of coffee processing and evaluation. In the current March/April issue, he is talking about Colorimeters versus Spectrophotometers. Sounds interesting?

ROAST ANALYSIS IS A CRITICAL STEP in ensuring finished-product quality and consistency in the roasting process. For the majority of coffee roasters, roast analysis is performed by sensory evaluation - both visual and taste evaluation (cupping) executed at the individual roast batch level. Many roasters supplement sensory evaluations with one or more objective measurements. 

Regardless of the method of analysis, the most important components in evaluating quality are determining which measurements are critical to quality, deciding the most appropriate analysis to be performed and, importantly, identifying the variables that affect measurements.

A prototype of a leveling device designed for sample preparation, pictured with an Agtron sample dish. (Photo Credit: Chris Hallien)

Visual Evaluation

The prevailing method for roast analysis is visual evaluation (or inspection). As simple and intuitive as it may seem, there are a number of factors that impact this process. No standard best practices exist for visual inspection of roasted coffee. The field of sensory science provides guidance for performing visual evaluation and, while the entirety of recommendations may seem excessive or impractical, there are several factors relevant to roast analysis. Utilization of color standards, common in color inspection for other industries, is rarely employed in coffee evaluation. In coffee, color standards—also known as reference samples—are roasted coffee samples pulled from production and approved as color targets, which then serve as a visual reference for subsequent roast comparison. 

Best practices recommend the following: 

  • sample size of 3 inches by 5 inches (7.5 centimeters by 12.5 centimeters);
  • sample viewing geometry of either 0 degrees or 45 degrees; and
  • samples oriented side by side.

Head over to Roast to read the rest of the article!

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Kaffee Panel 系列 - 第 2 部分:Carsten Wolters

来自 Roestbar 的 Carsten Wolters 烘焙的是一款来自 Finca Vizcaya 的水洗危地马拉咖啡。 在我们 Kaffee Panel 系列的第二篇文章中,我们将向您介绍来自德国明斯特 Roestbar 的 Carsten Wolters。

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Roastery   -   Quality Control / Cupping   -   Blog posts

Kaffee Panel 系列 - 第 1 部分:Philip Weller

今年年初,我们邀请了四位经验丰富的烘焙师参加我们的网络讲座,了解他们如何在 Kaffee Panel 竞赛中取得佳绩。 为此,我们分析了他们烘焙曲线,对他们的不同方法进行了讨论。

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正确进行调整

调整。 为了制作出美味的意式浓缩咖啡,达到品质标准以及留住和吸引更多客户,调整无疑是一项首要任务。 调整不过是使用您现有的设备,对冲煮参数进行理想调整,以获得最佳品质咖啡的过程。 我们知道,这说起来简单,做起来难。 我们还知道如何让这个过程变得更加简单,让您和您的同事更加轻松。 我们如何知道 Cropster Cafe 能让这个过程更加轻松简单? 因为有这些来自客户的积极反馈:

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